Baked Apple Cider Donut Holes and Honey Cinnamon Ice Cream

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One of the things I miss most about New England is going apple picking–and of course getting some warm apple cider donuts from the farm. I don’t typically like donuts but there is just something about apple cider donuts that sets them apart from any other donut. I found the recipe for this baked version online that tastes just like the real thing. They went perfectly with the homemade honey cinnamon ice cream I was dying to make from the Flour cookbook–my all time favorite book for desserts. My wonderful cousins bought it for me after falling in love with the bakery. If you’re in Boston, a visit to Flour Bakery is in order. You will thank me (and my cousins) later. Sorry I didn’t get any pictures- you’ll just have to trust me on this one. A few people at the dinner party said it was the best ice cream they ever had and there wasn’t a single donut hole left in sight, so hopefully that is proof enough.

Baked Apple Cider Donut Holes (Courtesy of Feastie)

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 large egg, room temperature
  • 2/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup apple butter (they sell a yummy honey apple butter at Trader Joes)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup apple cider
  • 1/3 cup plain yogurt (I used plain nonfat Greek yogurt)
  • 2 Tbsp canola oil
  • canola cooking spray
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp cinnamon
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees and spray a mini muffin pan with cooking spray. 
  2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon. 
  3. In another large bowl, whisk together the egg, brown sugar, apple butter, vanilla extract, honey, apple cider, yogurt, and canola oil. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredient mixture and whisk until just incorporated. Don’t over-mix – a few lumps are okay. 
  4. Using a tablespoon or cookie scoop, fill a 24-hole mini muffin pan with the batter; fill each hole only 3/4 of the way, or you’ll end up with huge mini muffins. Bake for approximately 10-12 minutes and cool on a wire rack. 
  5. While donut holes are still warm, combine cinnamon and sugar in another dish. Dip the top of the muffin in the cinnamon sugar mixture. Roll the donut hole in the cinnamon sugar to coat the sides and top. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Honey Cinnamon Ice Cream (courtesy of Flour: Spectacular Recipes from Boston’s Flour Bakery + Cafe)

  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cinnamon stick, 2 inches long
  • 8 egg yolks
  • 3/4 cup honey
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

In a medium saucepan, combine the milk and cream. Break up the cinnamon stick into several pieces and toss them into the pan. Scald the milk mixture over medium-high heat (bubbles start to form around the edge of the pan, but the liquid is not boiling). Remove from the heat and let the cinnamon steep in the milk mixture for about 1 hour.

In a medium bowl, whisk the egg yolks until blended, and then slowly whisk in the honey, sugar, and ground cinnamon until combined. Return the milk mixture to medium-high heat and scald again. Slowly add the hot milk mixture to the egg-honey mixture, a little at a time, whisking constantly. When all of the hot milk mixture has been incorporated, return the contents of the bowl to the saucepan, and return the saucepan to medium heat. Cook, stirring continuously with a wooden spoon, for 6 to 8 minutes, or until the mixture thickens and coats the back of the spoon. The mixture will seem watery at first, then it will start to steam, and then it will start to develop a little body and get thicker. Remove from the heat and immediately strain through a fine-mesh sieve into an airtight container. Whisk in the salt. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, or until cold, or up to overnight.

Churn in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s directions.

When the ice cream has finished churning, freeze it for at least 2 hours to allow it to ripen. During the ripening process, the ice cream becomes harder and smoother and the flavors more fully develop. The ice cream can be stored in an airtight container in the freezer for up to 1 week.

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One response »

  1. Pingback: A Festive Fall Dinner Party « The Kitchen Faerie

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